vendredi 3 avril 2015

1222

An article (abbreviated art) is a word (or prefix or suffix) that is used with a noun to indicate the type of reference being made by the noun. Articles specify grammatical definiteness of the noun, in some languages extending to volume or numerical scope. The articles in the English language are the and a/an, and (in certain contexts) some'An' and 'a' are modern forms of the Old English 'an', which in Anglian dialects was the number 'one' (compare 'on', in Saxon dialects) and survived into Modern Scots as the number 'ane'. Both 'on' (respelled 'one' by the Normans) and 'an' survived into Modern English, with 'one' used as the number and 'an' ('a', before nouns that begin with a consonant sound) as an indefinite article.
Traditionally in English, an article is usually considered to be a type of adjective. In some languages, articles are a special part of speech, which cannot easily be combined with other parts of speech. It is also possible for articles to be part of another part of speech category such as adeterminer, an English part of speech category that combines articles and demonstratives (such as 'this' and 'that').
In languages that employ articles, every common noun, with some exceptions, is expressed with a certain definiteness (e.g., definite or indefinite), just as many languages express every noun with a certain grammatical number (e.g., singular or plural). Every noun must be accompanied by the article, if any, corresponding to its definiteness, and the lack of an article (considered a zero article) itself specifies a certain definiteness. This is in contrast to other adjectives and determiners, which are typically optional. This obligatory nature of articles makes them among the most common words in many languages—in English, for example, the most frequent word is the.[1]
1981
Articles are usually characterized as either definite or indefinite.[2] A few languages with well-developed systems of articles may distinguish additional subtypes. Within each type, languages may have various forms of each article, according to grammatical attributes such as gender,number, or case, or according to adjacent sounds.An article (abbreviated art) is a word (or prefix or suffix) that is used with a noun to indicate the type of reference being made by the noun. Articles specify grammatical definiteness of the noun, in some languages extending to volume or numerical scope. The articles in the English language are the and a/an, and (in certain contexts) some. 'An' and 'a' are modern forms of the Old English 'an', which in Anglian dialects was the number 'one' (compare 'on', in Saxon dialects) and survived into Modern Scots as the number 'ane'. Both 'on' (respelled 'one' by the Normans) and 'an' survived into Modern English, with 'one' used as the number and 'an' ('a', before nouns that begin with a consonant sound) as an indefinite article.
Traditionally in English, an article is usually considered to be a type of adjective. In some languages, articles are a special part of speech, which cannot easily be combined with other parts of speech. It is also possible for articles to be part of another part of speech category such as adeterminer, an English part of speech category that combines articles and demonstratives (such as 'this' and 'that').
In languages that employ articles, every common noun, with some exceptions, is expressed with a certain definiteness (e.g., definite or indefinite), just as many languages express every noun with a certain grammatical number (e.g., singular or plural). Every noun must be accompanied by the article, if any, corresponding to its definiteness, and the lack of an article (considered a zero article) itself specifies a certain definiteness. This is in contrast to other adjectives and determiners, which are typically optional. This obligatory nature of articles makes them among the most common words in many languages—in English, for example, the most frequent word is the.[1]
Articles are usually characterized as either definite or indefinite.[2] A few languages with well-developed systems of articles may distinguish additional subtypes. Within each type, languages may have various forms of each article, according to grammatical attributes such as gender,number, or case, or according to adjacent sounds.

vendredi 20 juin 2014

STRESS AND DISTRESS

By Paul J. Hannig, Ph.D., MFCC

Stress is self-imposed in one way or another. You create your life and your life is created by what is inside of you and the choices that you make. You are responsible for every thought and feelings that you have. No one else creates your life, nor is anyone else responsible for your thoughts, feelings and choices.

jeudi 20 mars 2014

Warning! What Looks Like Eczema or Psoriasis on the Breast Could Be Paget's Disease - Breast Cancer

The rare breast cancer disease - Paget's disease (Paget's disease of the nipple or Mammary Paget's disease) is often confused with the two common skin conditions eczema and psoriasis. All which are very similar, and which often force doctors to send their patients to specialists for correct diagnosis.

samedi 15 mars 2014

Immunotherapy: Fighting The Cancers From Inside

The statistics are grim: one out of three people is expected to develop cancer in their lifetime; one in four cancer patients dies. To make matters worse, there are also more than two hundred different types of cancer, all asking for different treatment approaches. As of recently, there is a new hope for cancer patients - a potentially revolutionary new treatment: cancer immunotherapy.

Avoiding Drugs - Curing Cancer With Herbs - Part 3

The following herbs are considered to help either cure, or prevent cancer from developing - (1. Turmeric, 2. Garlic, 3. European Mistletoe 4. Cat's Claw, 5. Black Cohosh, and 6. Green Tea have previously been discussed in part-1 and 2 of this 3-part series).

Cancer: Our Era Disease

It really pains my heart when I hear about cancer and how it became our all times spreading disease. Cancer rates are increasing globally and there is no medicine discovered until now that can completely 100% cure cancer. Cancer is an abnormal growth of cells; there are more than 100 types of cancer, including breast cancer, skin cancer, lung cancer, colon cancer, prostate cancer, and leukemia. Symptoms vary depending on the type. Cancer patients are hardly pushed for treatment either with chemotherapy, radiation, and/or surgery.

Alternative Cancer Cures - Turmeric As an Anti-Cancer Agent - Part 1

Having been used for over 4,000 years to help treat an array of different illnesses, turmeric (curcuma longa) seems to have found its way into the spotlight again. "So what is it all about?" - "Let us take a closer look at this popular India curry spice."